Archive For The “History” Category

Largest Protest in U.S. History Was the Women’s March

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womens march

Though different publications are providing different figures, The Independent reports that between 3.3 and 4.6 million people walked and carried signs in the Women’s March, 750,000 in Los Angeles, 575,000 in Washington D.C., 450,000 in New York, 250,000 in Chicago and many smaller figures in other cities, making this the largest protest in American history….

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The Articles of Confederation

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articles of confederation

The Articles of Confederation were an agreement among the 13 founding states, legally establishing the United States of America as a confederation of sovereign states and serving as its first constitution. Though they are influential even to this day, the Articles created a weak government that ultimately was replaced in 1789 by the United States…

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The Transformation Into the Modern World

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modern world

The central argument of The Global Transformation is straightforward: during the 19th century, this transformation remade the basic structure of international order. This involved a complex configuration of industrialization, rational state-building, and ideologies of progress. What do we mean by these terms? By industrialization we mean both the commercialization of agriculture and the two-stage industrial…

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A Historical Perspective of the West Nile Virus In the U.S.

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west nile

Prior to 1999, West Nile virus (WNV) was a bit player in the screenplay of global vector-borne viral diseases. First discovered in the West Nile District of Uganda in 1937, this Culex sp.-transmitted virus was known for causing small human febrile outbreaks in Africa and the Middle East. Prior to 1995, the last major human…

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History of the Neurosciences in the USA Part I

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neuroscience 1

“How can a three-pound mass of jelly that you can hold in your palm imagine angels, contemplate the meaning of infinity, and even question its own place in the cosmos?” pondered the neuroscientist vs. Ramachandran. His quest for an understanding of the brain, like that of many others, represents our basic human desire to comprehend…

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History of the Neurosciences in the USA Part II

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neuroscience 2

This is the second of two articles on the history of neurosciences. You’ll find Part I of this article here. Julius Axelrod was a biochemist who began his career working in pharmacology after famously being denied admission to medical school. He won the 1970 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for discoveries regarding the pre-synaptic…

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