Author Archive

The Great Recession of 2008

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The Great Recession, which officially lasted from December 2007 to June 2009, began with the bursting of an 8 trillion dollar housing bubble. The resulting loss of wealth led to sharp cutbacks in consumer spending. This loss of consumption, combined with the financial market chaos triggered by the bursting of the bubble, also led to…

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A Historical Perspective of the West Nile Virus In the U.S.

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west nile

Prior to 1999, West Nile virus (WNV) was a bit player in the screenplay of global vector-borne viral diseases. First discovered in the West Nile District of Uganda in 1937, this Culex sp.-transmitted virus was known for causing small human febrile outbreaks in Africa and the Middle East. Prior to 1995, the last major human…

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History, Art & Education

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The popularity of the study of history has been steadily dropping in the United States. History, it turns out, is just “too boring.” Oh really? We strongly disagree. Perhaps it’s the presentation of history that is at fault, and not the history itself. History, art and education are intrinsically intertwined, as we hope to demonstrate….

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History of the Neurosciences in the USA Part I

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neuroscience 1

“How can a three-pound mass of jelly that you can hold in your palm imagine angels, contemplate the meaning of infinity, and even question its own place in the cosmos?” pondered the neuroscientist vs. Ramachandran. His quest for an understanding of the brain, like that of many others, represents our basic human desire to comprehend…

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History of the Neurosciences in the USA Part II

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neuroscience 2

This is the second of two articles on the history of neurosciences. You’ll find Part I of this article here. Julius Axelrod was a biochemist who began his career working in pharmacology after famously being denied admission to medical school. He won the 1970 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for discoveries regarding the pre-synaptic…

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